Author: donald barnat

What Men Want

I remember something that was in circulation back around, I believe, the 1990s. Went like this:

Women just want to be listened to and men just want to be trusted.

Okay. At the risk of losing a great percentage of readers at this point, I have to admit that, yes, this actually resonated with me.

Because somehow I’ve always wanted more than anything else that every women I ever encountered, even if I’d just exchanged a glance with her, could trust me.

And when I leave this earth, I never wanted any woman or girl to be able to say, that guy was physically inappropriate with me. He was a creep. 

Sadly, many could (and doubtless will) say, that guy was physically inappropriate FOR me. But that’s another problem entirely.

My attitude with women has always been, if you’re not interested in me, I’m sure as hell not interested in you. Or, more accurately, I’m not going to show any interest in you.

So with each passing day in this train wreck of a societal purging, as much as it pains me to hear of how many woman have been victimized by so many men, I haven’t been able to help feeling better about how I’ve lived my life around women.

Physically, I must emphasize. Because I do have a famously inappropriate sense of humor. But I spare anyone who I don’t believe shares that sense of humor and right now that has come down to really only one person. Oh, honey…

 

Women of Color Organize for Access and Accountability in Photojournalism – The New York Times

“Tara Pixley often felt isolated in the newsrooms where she worked as a photographer or photo editor. As a “black woman who was the child of immigrants, raised by a single mom, and also a first-generation college student,” she struggled for a decade to fit in. She was the only woman of color in the photo departments where she worked and was ignored or treated dismissively.”

 

 

 

The Unseen Robert Frank: Outtakes From ‘The Americans’ – The New York Times

“In his introduction to Robert Frank’s seminal photo book, “The Americans,” Jack Kerouac claimed the photographer had captured “scenes that have never been seen before on film.” He was referring not to particular people, places or objects but to “the humor, the sadness, the EVERYTHING-ness and American-ness” Mr. Frank documented as he traveled the country on a Guggenheim Fellowship beginning in 1955. At a time when mainstream publications tended to favor a rosy view of American life, Mr. Frank presented a comparatively stark vision that also challenged the aesthetics of popular photography.”